Evangelicals defy abortion and gay marriage laws in ‘Declaration of Dependence’

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  • #20324
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    mary
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    Evangelical Christians have expressed their firm opposition to abortion rights and same-sex marriage in a document titled “Declaration of Dependence.”

    The document contains a pledge to refuse government mandate to support or fund abortions and oppose “same-sex marriage, polygamy, bestiality, and all other forms of sexual perversion prohibited by Holy Scripture.”

    “Therefore, we, the undersigned – not only as Christians but also believing we have the constitutional right as Americans to follow these time honored Christian beliefs – commit to conducting our churches, ministries, businesses, and personal lives in accordance with our Christian faith and choose to obey God rather than man,” the document concluded.

    The “Declaration of Dependence” appeared as a full-page advertisement in the Sunday edition of the New York Times.

    See full article at “The Christian Times

    #20326
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    drdj
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    I believe these issues are between the individual and God. I am not a fan of abortion. Having an adopted child makes one realize the precious act of human kindness a mother does by bringing a baby to term and allowing a family to raise and love that child.

    I respect the fact some cases warrant abortion – when the life of the mother is SEVERELY at risk and so law which outlaws abortion is impossible.

    If someone wants to interpret the Bible as saying same-sex relations are wrong, that is between them and God but they do not have the right to impose their views on me. Today I posted on Facebook an item about the Commission on Religious Accommodation saying religions do not have the right to supercede human rights. On this issue, that makes a great deal of sense. The problem is there are many “religions” and what Evangelicals want may differ from what Muslims want and that may differ from what Buddhists want – thus one needs to put human rights ahead of all.

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